Impact of Smoking Cessation Training for Community Pharmacists in Indonesia

Contributors : Susi Ari Kristina, Montarat Thavorncharoensap, Petcharat Pongcharoensuk, Yayi Suryo Prabandari

Abstract
Background: Community pharmacists play an important role in tobacco control and adequate training on
smoking cessation is essential. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design was used. A one-day workshop on smoking cessation organized by Indonesian Pharmacists Association as part of PCE program was offered to 133 community pharmacists. The workshop consisted of a 3-hour lecture and a 3-hour role-play session. Pre-training and post-training surveys assessed the impact of training on parameters including knowledge, perceived role and self-efficacy with respect to smoking cessation counseling practices. Intention and ability to perform counseling using the 5A framework was assessed after training only.

read more

Effectiveness of Tobacco Education for Pharmacy Students in Indonesia

Contributors : Susi Ari Kristina, Montarat Thavorncharoensap, Petcharat Pongcharoensuk,Preecha Montakantikul, Thanarat Suansanae, Yayi Suryo Prabandari Abstract BACKGROUND:

Smoking remains the major preventable cause of death worldwide, especially cancer-related death. Evidence clearly indicates that tobacco-related morbidity and mortality is reduced by smoking cessation. Pharmacists are well-positioned to provide tobacco cessation services an involvement of pharmacists in smoking cessation is encouraged by several organizations. While Indonesia’s prevalence of smoking is in the first rank in Asian countries, none of the pharmacy schools in Indonesia are currently offering tobacco-related courses in their existing curricula at present. Our study aimed to develop and to evaluate the effectiveness of tobacco education (TE) for pharmacy students in Indonesia.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:

read more

Developing and Validating a Guideline on Doctor-patient Communication for Southeast Asian Context

Contributors : Mora Claramita, Yayi Suryo Prabandari, Jan van Dalen, Cees van der Vleuten

Abstract
Introduction: In Southeast Asia there is a big gap between the partnership style now desired by patients and the reality of actual practice, which reflects a more paternalistic style. Asian culture, with its hierarchical social system, less autonomy for members of society and less verbally explicit communication style contributes to this difference. This paper describes the development and validation of a guideline to help doctors in the context of the study to become more patient-centered.

read more

Reading Culture from Tobacco Advertisements in Indonesia

Contributors : Mimi Nichter, S Padmawati, M Danardono, N Ng, Y Prabandari, Mark Nichter

ABSTRACT
Background: Tobacco advertising in Indonesia is among the most aggressive and innovative in the world, and tobacco advertisements saturate the environment. Tobacco companies are politically and financially powerful in the country because they are one of the largest sources of government revenue. As a result, there are few restrictions on tobacco marketing and advertising. National surveys reveal that 62% of men and 1% to 3% of women are smokers. Over 90% of smokers smoke clove cigarettes (kretek). This paper examines the social and cultural reasons for smoking in Indonesia and discusses how the tobacco industry reads, reproduces and works with culture as a means of selling cigarettes. An analysis is provided of how kretek tobacco companies represent themselves as supporters of Indonesian national identity. This analysis is used to identify strategies to break the chains of positive association that currently support
widespread smoking.

read more

Perawatan Kehamilan dalam Perspektif Budaya Madura di Desa Tambak dan Desa Rapalaok Kecamatan Omben Kabupaten Sampang

Contributors : Mimi Nichter, S Padmawati, M Danardono, N Ng, Y Prabandari, Mark Nichter

ABSTRACT
Background: Tobacco advertising in Indonesia is among the most aggressive and innovative in the world, and tobacco advertisements saturate the environment. Tobacco companies are politically and financially powerful in the country because they are one of the largest sources of government revenue. As a result, there are few restrictions on tobacco marketing and advertising. National surveys reveal that 62% of men and 1% to 3% of women are smokers. Over 90% of smokers smoke clove cigarettes (kretek). This paper examines the social and cultural reasons for smoking in Indonesia and discusses how the tobacco industry reads, reproduces and works with culture as a means of selling cigarettes. An analysis is provided of how kretek tobacco companies represent themselves as supporters of Indonesian national identity. This analysis is used to identify strategies to break the chains of positive association that currently support
widespread smoking.

read more